ANTI- DEPRESSION DRIVE

90%
Raised: ₹115,000 ₹128,000Campaign has ended

Anti- Depression Drive we covered approximately 10000 people including Students. We run this campaign for continuous 45 days at different places like government schools, orphanage, public places SDM office, etc.

Depression is a disease haunting millions of youth in India. Depression generally occurs due to lack of motivation for a long period. It is known that depression can manifest in multiple forms and it differs from person to person but the one term constant with depression is the destruction of a person's life.

G3S Foundation as a social outreach partner of The Ray Event tried to motivate people to be persistent in their efforts and never give up because sunrise always happens, no matter how dark the night was. We need some colour in our lives this can be done by doing what makes us happy or by taking up a new hobby or doing anything and everything to get out of a rut. It helps both mentally and physically as both of them are not separate entities.

The Ray Anti-Depression Drive was dedicated to make Indian youth aware of depression and to help them get over it. We strived to inspire every individual who is going through the tough phase of his/her life. The main aim to conduct this campaign was to spread the message of HOPE among the mass. Our volunteers urged people to speak out against depression through performing their Street plays for continuous 45 days at the different places like Government schools, Orphanage, Night Shelter, Public parks etc. In Delhi. Through this campaign we have covered approximately 10000 people including youngest Students of schools and colleges.



DIGITAL LITERACY

90%
Raised: ₹115,000 ₹128,000Campaign has ended

With this vision, G3S Foundation a pioneer in the field of technology education in many ways, has a noble mission to take technology to the common man, in other words, to improve ‘Digital Literacy’ in India.

MAKING ONE PERSON IN EVERY FAMILY DIGITALLY LITERATE IS ONE OF THE INTEGRAL COMPONENTS OF THE PRIME MINISTER‘S VISION OF “DIGITAL INDIA” FOR WHICH THE INDIAN GOVERNMENT HAS FORMULATED TO IMPART DIGITAL LITERACY TRAINING TO CITIZENS ACROSS INDIA.

In a country with more than 6,50,000 villages, where more than half of its population live in rural areas and villages. Most are remote and too isolated to benefit from the country’s impressive economic progress. Yet there’s a growing desire among people in rural India to be part of the modern Digital India. But the last-mile delivery has always been a challenge for India due to low technology literacy among the rural citizens.

The need for digital literacy in a country as populous and diverse as India is critical. If it is used for education, health care, citizen services, financial services, or any other basic need, technology and connectivity, it can make a huge difference to the socio-economic levels of a community, and ultimately to the country, since true progress comes from inclusive growth. Digital Literacy plays a vital role in e-services like e-commerce, e-governance e-panchayat, e-learning, etc. In current scenario, technology is becoming an inevitable part of our daily life, be it using mobile phones, drawing cash from ATM machines, booking a railway ticket etc. Hence, there is a need that every individual in the country must be equipped with necessary skills so as to use the technology with responsibility. The definition of who is considered a literate or educated has evolved over time and it is not complete without Digital Literacy. Digital Literacy, according to the popular definition is the ability to locate, organize, understand, evaluate, and create information using digital technology.



MENSTRUAL HYGEINE AWARENESS DRIVE

90%
Raised: ₹115,000 ₹128,000Campaign has ended

Women spend around six to seven years of their lives menstruating. Yet the importance of menstrual hygiene management (MHM) is mostly neglected. Menstrual hygiene is a taboo subject; a topic that many women are uncomfortable discussing in public. This is compounded by gender inequality, which excludes women and girls from decision-making processes. Seventy percent of mothers consider menstruation ‘dirty’.

Our approach is to promote awareness among the girls and women and their families and introduce new, low cost, locally appropriate simple solutions.

In India, recently, there has been an increasing recognition of the importance of menstrual hygiene. Ministries recognize that MHM can improve young women’s health, nutritional status and well-being, as well as their school enrolment and retention, potentially conferring long-term health, social, and economic benefits. We make efforts towards embedding measures within the system to promote menstrual hygiene, and give women and girls the confidence and space to voice their need for improved menstrual hygiene. Our work focusses on integrating menstrual hygiene management into programmers and policies across key sectors including WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene), health, women and girl’s development, education and rights, from community to the national levels.